My personal Nanowrimo event

Posted on Mon 31 July 2017 in News • 2 min read

In the last few days I crossed a big mental barrier. I've reached 150,000 words of my rewrite of Weaver of Dreams. Word counts by themselves are fairly meaningless but this particular milestone also marks the transition from Act 2 to Act 3 of my story. This was a difficult part of the book to write, and I'm not completely happy with it. There will be edits in the future but for the sake of the draft it means I can move on. The pieces are in place, my heroine can only move forward towards the conclusion.

I estimate that will take another 50,000 words to finish the story. This takes me to a revised total of 200,000. That's not a short book, but not overly long either by the standards of the genre.

As an aside, I briefly considered breaking it into a trilogy. I have a rough idea for a sequel and figured it would perhaps make sense to run them together and drag out the end into a third book. However, after talking with my wife I decided against it. I may write a follow up story (and will certainly write others set in the same world), but for all intents and purposes I've committed now to concluding Lillian and Emilan's story in a single volume.

50,000 words feels like an achievable goal. I've done it before -- several times in fact during Nanowrimo. So beginning tomorrow (1st of August), I'll embark on my own private marathon -- a personal Nanowrimo -- towards the finish. My goal is simple: write 50,000 words in the month of August. I'll also include the 1st of September, which will round off the week as well as the month. To keep me honest I'll post my progress as I go.

My approach will be simple. In the morning I'll quickly recap what I wrote the day before. Then I'll pencil out the key points of scenes I want to write. I'll mull it over in work. Then when I get home and after I help to feed the kids and put them to bed, I'll sit down and aim to bash out 1500-1600 words. Rinse-and-repeat for 32 days, and hopefully I'll be done!

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